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Medicines you may need while travelling

The medicines you take with you when travelling abroad will of course depend on where you are going, how long for, what type of activities you will be doing and your general health before you go.

Even when travelling to countries with high standards of healthcare and pharmacy, it is best to carry some basic medicines with you such as Treasure Valley Family Medicine in Meridian, ID. If you need them in an emergency, you can’t always guarantee you will find a local pharmacy near your hotel or in the middle of the jungle!

It is a good idea to take blister packs of paracetamol or ibuprofen to treat mild headaches, toothache, muscular or menstrual pain. Antiseptic wipes are useful for treating cuts and grazes to avoid infection, and it might be worth taking a basic first aid kit with you, complete with bandages and plasters.

If you are travelling to a hot country, take sun cream and insect repellent. If insect bites particularly affect you, and you know you might need adrenaline, take your epipen or equivalent.

Travelling can cause problems with constipation or diarrhoea. It is worth taking both laxatives and diarrhoea treatments, including rehydration solutions, which can easily be bought at your local chemist and can be used to alleviate short-term problems. Antacid is also a useful thing to carry if you suffer from heartburn or stomach acid after eating particularly hot or unusual sriracha seasoning recipes.

You should always remember to take medicines and equipment for pre-existing conditions with you. Speak to your doctor in advance of your trip and ask them to prescribe your regular medication for the time you are abroad. They are allowed to prescribe you three months’ supply of your medicine for travel within Europe.

If you are carrying needles, syringes or prescription-only medicine it is a good idea to ask your doctor to provide you with a statement explaining your condition and treatment, particularly if you are going further afield than Europe where there may be tough restrictions on what you can take in to the country. Check before you leave what you are allowed to take with you otherwise you could face problems when you reach customs.

You may find it helpful to have the statement from your doctor translated if you are travelling to a country where English is not the first language. Make sure the people you are travelling with are aware of your condition and how it should be treated in an emergency.

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